Data Policy

As a vendor in the cyber security space, Uptycs knows how important it is to protect what customers entrust us with.

To achieve these goals, we have multiple controls in place, and we are working towards achieving compliance to various standards, including SOC 2.

Uptycs monitors evolving regulations, threats, and customer requirements to ensure that our security is ever improving, ensuring that the service is safe, customer data remains confidential, and that the service’s availability minimizes downtime for customers.

Continue reading below to learn more about our security practices and policies. Or, click the quick-link below to jump to a specific section:

Encryption in Transit and at Rest

The company was established in 1999 in Argentina, and now operates in 12 additional countries, including Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican, Ecuador, México, Panamá, Perú, Portugal, Uruguay and Venezuela.

In order to maintain their foothold in Latin America, MercadoLibre continuously seeks to expand and improve its environment. According to Architecture Manager Darío Simonassi, “Each application is handled by a team that has total responsibility for its development and operation. In total, we have some 600 developers who are constantly creating new applications and enhancing existing ones.”

A few years ago, virtually all of the development teams were experiencing at least some operational issues. MercadoLibre’s engineering department believed that these problems were a normal part of having a hybrid cloud environment. Darío, however, began to believe that these issues could be resolved if the teams had better visibility into the underlying infrastructure. MercadoLibre had patched together a monitoring framework using various open source systems. This arrangement was proving difficult to integrate into a common system for comparing and correlating metrics across the many applications and infrastructure components that MercadoLibre was using.

“The constant changes being made by separate teams in a shared hybrid cloud environment proved to be too dynamic for these basic monitoring tools to handle,” Darío recalls. So he set out to find a tool that was purpose-built for monitoring multiple applications in a dynamic hybrid cloud infrastructure.

“The extent of the capabilities we were missing became really obvious when I saw a demonstration of Datadog at OSCON [Open Source Convention], so I knew this was exactly what we needed.”

The company was established in 1999 in Argentina, and now operates in 12 additional countries, including Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Dominican, Ecuador, México, Panamá, Perú, Portugal, Uruguay and Venezuela.

In order to maintain their foothold in Latin America, MercadoLibre continuously seeks to expand and improve its environment. According to Architecture Manager Darío Simonassi, “Each application is handled by a team that has total responsibility for its development and operation. In total, we have some 600 developers who are constantly creating new applications and enhancing existing ones.”

A few years ago, virtually all of the development teams were experiencing at least some operational issues. MercadoLibre’s engineering department believed that these problems were a normal part of having a hybrid cloud environment. Darío, however, began to believe that these issues could be resolved if the teams had better visibility into the underlying infrastructure. MercadoLibre had patched together a monitoring framework using various open source systems. This arrangement was proving difficult to integrate into a common system for comparing and correlating metrics across the many applications and infrastructure components that MercadoLibre was using.

“The constant changes being made by separate teams in a shared hybrid cloud environment proved to be too dynamic for these basic monitoring tools to handle,” Darío recalls. So he set out to find a tool that was purpose-built for monitoring multiple applications in a dynamic hybrid cloud infrastructure.

“The extent of the capabilities we were missing became really obvious when I saw a demonstration of Datadog at OSCON [Open Source Convention], so I knew this was exactly what we needed.”